The fruitfly, or Drosophila Melanogaster, is the most commonly used model organism in genetic research. At the beginning of the 20th century, research on fruitflies started the new scientific field of genetics. In march 2000, it was one of the first organisms whose Genome was completely decoded. Laboratories all over the world continue to breed and expose fruitflies to a plethora of substances, manipulations and radiation to deepen genetic insights and test usable genetic technologies.Wim Klerkx, 1999.

The fruitfly, or Drosophila Melanogaster, is the most commonly used model organism in genetic research. At the beginning of the 20th century, research on fruitflies started the new scientific field of genetics. In march 2000, it was one of the first organisms whose Genome was completely decoded. Laboratories all over the world continue to breed and expose fruitflies to a plethora of substances, manipulations and radiation to deepen genetic insights and test usable genetic technologies.
Wim Klerkx, 1999.

In 1901, biologists of Harvard University started using fruit flies for evolutionary experiments. Soon the flies proved their value as model organisms: widely available, easy to maintain in large quantities and blessed with a very short reproduction cycle.

In 1901, biologists of Harvard University started using fruit flies for evolutionary experiments. Soon the flies proved their value as model organisms: widely available, easy to maintain in large quantities and blessed with a very short reproduction cycle.

In 1910, a scientist spotted a fruit fly with white instead of red eyes among his stock. Trying to find out the cause led to extensive research in a fairly new branch of biology: genetics. The white eye phenomenon could be explained by the behaviour and location of genes. T.H. Morgan received the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1933.

In 1910, a scientist spotted a fruit fly with white instead of red eyes among his stock. Trying to find out the cause led to extensive research in a fairly new branch of biology: genetics. The white eye phenomenon could be explained by the behaviour and location of genes. T.H. Morgan received the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1933.

In the early 40's, a geneticist looked for the cause of an extra pair of wings that sometimes spontaneously occurred with fruitflies. Research revealed that the order in which segments of genes are placed on so-called chromosomes defines the body pattern of an organism. A few mutated genes can fool a growing organism into creating an extra part of the body. Lewis, Nusslein-Volhard and Wieshaus received the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1995.

In the early 40's, a geneticist looked for the cause of an extra pair of wings that sometimes spontaneously occurred with fruitflies. Research revealed that the order in which segments of genes are placed on so-called chromosomes defines the body pattern of an organism. A few mutated genes can fool a growing organism into creating an extra part of the body. Lewis, Nusslein-Volhard and Wieshaus received the Nobel prize for physiology or medicine in 1995.

Even in its short life-span, fruitflies are susceptible to cancer caused by damaged genes. In many laboratories fruitflies are exposed to toxic or radioactive substances to find out the effects on genes and offspring. As human genes are made of the same organic matter and use the same mechanisms as genes of the fruitfully, this research is to find out what substances should be handled with care.

Even in its short life-span, fruitflies are susceptible to cancer caused by damaged genes. In many laboratories fruitflies are exposed to toxic or radioactive substances to find out the effects on genes and offspring. As human genes are made of the same organic matter and use the same mechanisms as genes of the fruitfully, this research is to find out what substances should be handled with care.

The Gehring research-group of the University of Basel, Switserland found a way to recognise and control so-called key-genes of the fruit fly. A key-gene tells the growing body where it must grow a certain body-part and where the full plan for this part can be found along the chromosomes. When these key-genes are copied to other locations on chromosomes, red eye-facet cells can be grown on other body-parts like its legs.

The Gehring research-group of the University of Basel, Switserland found a way to recognise and control so-called key-genes of the fruit fly. A key-gene tells the growing body where it must grow a certain body-part and where the full plan for this part can be found along the chromosomes. When these key-genes are copied to other locations on chromosomes, red eye-facet cells can be grown on other body-parts like its legs.

With the control obtained from years of research it is fairly easy to breed a fruit fly with curled wings. It can live a normal life when it is fed. Researchers use it as a marker-fly. It can tell them if a certain chromosome has passed on to offspring. And conveniently it cannot fly. It may be bought at pet-shops for feeding reptiles or fish.

With the control obtained from years of research it is fairly easy to breed a fruit fly with curled wings. It can live a normal life when it is fed. Researchers use it as a marker-fly. It can tell them if a certain chromosome has passed on to offspring. And conveniently it cannot fly. It may be bought at pet-shops for feeding reptiles or fish.